First Visit

 
 
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Prior to your first antenatal appointment, please ensure:

  • You have completed and returned the Patient Registration and Privacy Consent Form.
  • You have returned your doctor’s referral letter. If you are unable to send this to Mark prior to your appointment, please bring it with you on the day of your first appointment. Please note that you need a new referral for each new pregnancy.
  • You bring a comprehensive list of your current medications, including any natural therapies.
 
 

Appointments

 
 

Every attempt will be made to see you at your appointed time, although occasionally there may be a delay. This usually occurs because another patient needs to be delivered during a consulting session. If this happens you will be offered another appointment, although you are welcome to wait until I return. Children are welcome, but we have found that they may be intolerant if there are long delays. It is always wise not to commit yourself immediately following your appointment.

Your first visit will generally be at 10 weeks gestation followed by 16, 20, 24, 28, 31, 34, 36, 38 weeks then weekly till delivery. Your postnatal visit will be 6 weeks after delivery and you should ring my rooms to arrange this soon after you leave hospital. Your partner is very welcome to attend your antenatal visits and will be most welcome at the birth of your baby. Please note that in some cases, you may need to see me more often, especially if your pregnancy is high risk.

It is important to discuss any questions with me and I will always make every attempt to answer them. It is often helpful to list these questions because you may forget to ask them during your antenatal visits.

At your second visit you will receive your Pregnancy Summary. This contains important medical information, including your blood group, and you will be given an updated version at each visit. You should bring this summary to hospital when you are admitted.

At around 24 weeks you will have a test for diabetes and a check on your blood count. At approximately 36 weeks I take a vaginal swab to test that you are not a carrier of Group B Streptococcus, a potentially dangerous bacteria found in one in seven women. If your test is positive both you and your baby will receive antibiotics during labour and delivery. With this treatment, no baby should be severely affected by Group B Streptococcus. For more information on prenatal testing, please see below.

To ensure the best outcomes, Mark limits the number of patients in his care at any one time. For this reason, please contact reception at your earliest opportunity to confirm Mark’s availability.

 
 
 
 

Holiday Cover

 
 
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My weekend and holiday cover will be shared with Dr Scott Shemer, Dr Vicky Woodward and Dr Jonathan Nettle.

My weekends off extend from Friday afternoon until Monday morning. In my absence there will be 24 hour cover by one of the covering Obstetricians and you should feel free to contact them as you would contact myself. They can be contacted via the Call Service on 9387 1000.